I Sit Beside The Fire And Think

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“I sit beside the fire and think
Of all that I have seen
Of meadow-flowers and butterflies
In summers that have been;

Of yellow leaves and gossamer
In autumns that there were,
With morning mist and silver sun
And wind upon my hair.

I sit beside the fire and think
Of how the world will be
When winter comes without a spring
That I shall ever see.

For still there are so many things
That I have never seen:
In every wood in every spring
There is a different green.

I sit beside the fire and think
Of people long ago
And people who will see a world
That I shall never know.

But all the while I sit and think
Of times there were before,
I listen for returning feet
And voices at the door.”

Behind the lines

This is one of my favorites by J.R.R. Tolkien (1892 – 1973). He wrote a contemplative lyric that anyone can relate to who has sat long by a mesmerizing fire. It’s the song of Bilbo Baggins from the Lord of the Rings which takes place in Rivendell not long before Frodo and the Fellowship of the Ring set out on their journey to destroy the One Ring. The song is a fireside reflection of joyful remembrance, curiosities unfulfilled, people never met, a future unknown, and a hopeful return of loved ones at our door like Frodo (Bilbo’s adopted nephew). It can be found in Chapter III – The Ring Goes South.

 

 

Hallelujah, What a Savior!

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“Man of sorrows what a name
For the Son of God, who came
Ruined sinners to reclaim:
Hallelujah, what a Savior!

Bearing shame and scoffing rude,
In my place condemned he stood,
Sealed my pardon with his blood:
Hallelujah, what a Savior!

Guilty, helpless, lost were we;
Blameless Lamb of God was he,
Sacrificed to set us free:
Hallelujah, what a Savior!

He was lifted up to die;
“It is finished” was his cry;
Now in heaven exalted high:
Hallelujah, what a Savior!

When he comes, our glorious King,
All his ransomed home to bring,
Then anew this song we’ll sing:
Hallelujah, what a Savior!”

Behind the lines

This is one of my favorite hymns written by Philip Bliss (1838 -1876). Below is a YouTube video of a contemporary version by the Shelly Moore Band. I had previously posted more on Bliss’ life and works highlighting another song of his “My Redeemer” here.

Anne Steele – A Hymn Story

This Anne Steele hymn story is one of the most searched and viewed posts on GraceSyallabes. I hope you enjoy the reblog about her life of hymn-writing.

GraceSyllables

This “Hymn Story” highlights the life and works of Anne Steele (1717-1778). Anne was one of the first significant female hymn writers and she wrote 144 of them. One my favorites is When I Survey Life’s Varied Scene and I’ve included it below.

Enduring much hardship in her life, Anne’s hymns are most known for laments that encourage us to trust God through difficulties. This particular hymn offers hope and brings powerful praise by focusing on His grace in the midst of struggle.

There is controversy surrounding her story, but shouldn’t every good story have a little controversy? Hymnary.org is one source that provides the following details of her life:

“Anne Steele was born at Broughton, Hampshire, in 1717. Her father was a timber merchant, and at the same time officiated as the lay pastor of the Baptist Society at Broughton (England). Her mother died when she was 3. At the age of 19 she became an…

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