Christ Exalted

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Righteous Redeemer, a cross raised high,
Humbled He came, forsaken to die,
He took our sin, God in our place,
Now we sing Christ, amazing grace.

Righteous Redeemer, sent to save,
His great power conquered the grave,
Risen Savior, the Hope for man,
Forgiveness of sin, His sovereign plan.

Christ exalted, Spirit move,
Draw us near, dead hearts made new,
Great is the gospel, it’s Your fame,
Christ exalted, we proclaim.

Righteous Redeemer, seated on high,
Holy, Holy, Holy the cry,
He reigns eternal, Savior and King,
Christ Exalted, the praise we sing.

(Bridge)
This myst’ry, Christ in me, the Hope of glory,
This myst’ry, Christ in me, the Hope of glory.

Behind the lines

Co-written with David Ennis, Drew Pearce, and Kevin Schultz.

Behold, my servant shall act wisely; he shall be high and lifted up, and shall be exalted (Isaiah 52:13 ESV).

The God of our fathers raised Jesus, whom you killed by hanging him on a tree. God exalted him at his right hand as Leader and Savior, to give repentance to Israel and forgiveness of sins. And we are witnesses to these things, and so is the Holy Spirit, whom God has given to those who obey him  (Acts 5:30-32 ESV).

And being found in human form, he humbled himself by becoming obedient to the point of death, even death on a cross. Therefore God has highly exalted him and bestowed on him the name that is above every name, so that at the name of Jesus every knee should bow, in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and every tongue confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father (Philippians 2:8-11 ESV).

To them God chose to make known how great among the Gentiles are the riches of the glory of this mystery, which is Christ in you, the hope of glory (Colossians 1:27 ESV).

Praise the Lord All Nations

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There’s a new child of God somewhere in the world,
Rejoicing and singing to the Lord,
People from all nations tell of salvation,
Rejoicing and singing to the Lord.

Praise the Lord all nations,
Praise the Lord all nations,
Go, and praise the Lord!

Alabado sea el Señor (Spanish)
Louez le Seigneur (French)
Praise the Lord! Praise the Lord!
Preist den Herrn (German)
Lodate il Signore (Italian)
Praise the Lord! Praise the Lord!
Let’s praise the Lord.

Let ev’ry tribe and tongue have a universal song,
Rejoicing and singing to the Lord,
Proclaiming the gospel, making disciples,
Rejoicing and singing to the Lord.

For Your love is greater,
You’re faithful forever,
Praise the Lord!

Behind the lines

Psalm 117

“Rhythms of Grace” Review

I recently completed Mike Cosper’s book Rhythms of Grace: How the Church’s Worship Tells the Story of the Gospel and was able to sing along because he skillfully frames church worship, liturgy, and the gospel story.


Cosper inspires by retelling the story of worship starting before the beginning, through creation and the Garden, and on to the coming of the Son of Man. He ends his summary of gospel song this way:

“That’s the story of worship: God creates, sin corrupts, but Christ redeems. And all of us get to sing along.”

He goes on to break down worship into three parts:

  • One object and author
  • Two contexts
  • Three audiences

He writes, “God is at the center of our worship. He is the single most glorious thing in the whole universe, the One to whom we ascribe the greatest and highest worth…Worship is about God, from beginning to end.”

Cosper distinguishes the two contexts as scattered and gathered. When scattered we worship and spread the gospel individually. We represent Christ as He works and sings through us while we’re going. But when we come together, we sing the same gospel to one another.

“The gathered body teaches the Word and proclaims it together; we speak the truth in love as we sing, read the Scriptures, and remember the gospel together.”

He defines the three audiences:  God, the church, and the watching world.

“There is God, who is both the object of our praise and a witness to us as we praise him; there is  the church, which both participates in and witnesses the lives and gatherings of the people, and there is the world watching from the darkness.”

Cosper then challenges us with what goes wrong when we confuse these categories and overemphasize contexts and audiences. He tells the story of the church, provides excellent examples of gospel shaped liturgy, and beautifully reminds us:

“The gospel is what connects people – not music. Our differences are never so slight as they are at the foot of the cross.”

“If we’re gathering humbly, united by the gospel, we should be marked by a sense of thankfulness that brings us together, regardless of our stylistic and cultural decisions.”

“If music in the church is just about consumeristic preference, then my singing is motivated by personal tastes. If singing is about letting God’s Word dwell among us, then my singing is motivated by love for God.”

“We need to be willing to boldly challenge tradition for the sake of gospel clarity.”

What about you? Are you singing the gospel and worshiping with clarity, passion, and a love for God and other people? Are you willing to give grace to others who have different worship styles and preferences?

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