Musty Yearbook Memories of You

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Verse 1
I found my old yearbook back when we dated in school

And I opened it up and read an autographed section from you
It was a long winding letter about how much you were in love
But it wasn’t but a few months later that we finally broke up

Chorus
Yeah, the flashbacks are fadin like the pages from those old scenes

Along with black and white photos of friends wearing acid washed jeans
And the words you wrote around the ad on page 122
Are like forgotten combination lockers lining those long empty halls
They don’t mean anything now at all, it’s just words on dusty pages
And musty yearbook memories of you

Verse 2
I found several funny pictures of friends with their big hairspray hair

And I had forgotten the fashion until I saw what we all used to wear
Everything seems weird now so I stuck the book back in a storage bin
And maybe in another ten years I’ll pull it back out and look at it again

Bridge
Should I keep this old yearbook or just throw it away

Half the names and all the phone numbers aren’t good now anyway
There’s a lot written in there that’s better left packed up in the past
And after it’s gone, no one will ever ask

Saint Patrick’s Hymn

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Saint Patrick’s Hymn is also known as Saint Patrick’s Breastplate, The Deer’s Cry, or The Lorica of Saint Patrick and has been attributed to him. It was also adapted into the hymn I Bind Unto Myself Today (1889) by Cecil Frances Alexander (1818-1895) which is provided below. There have been many different adaptations as the YouTube version at the end illustrates and you’ll find many sources with varying lyrics for it.  In addition, it’s often used as a prayer especially the last part which is my favorite beginning with “Christ be with me…”

I bind unto myself today
The strong Name of the Trinity,
By invocation of the same,
The Three in One, and One in Three.

I bind this day to me forever,
By power of faith, Christ’s Incarnation;
His baptism in Jordan river;
His death on cross for my salvation;
His bursting from the spicèd tomb;
His riding up the heavenly way;
His coming at the day of doom:
I bind unto myself today.

I bind unto myself the power
Of the great love of cherubim;
The sweet “Well done” in judgment hour;
The service of the seraphim;
Confessors’ faith, apostles’ word,
The patriarchs’ prayers, the prophets’ scrolls;
All good deeds done unto the Lord,
And purity of virgin souls.

I bind unto myself today
The virtues of the starlit heaven
The glorious sun’s life-giving ray,
The whiteness of the moon at even,
The flashing of the lightning free,
The whirling wind’s tempestuous shocks,
The stable earth, the deep salt sea,
Around the old eternal rocks.

I bind unto myself today
The power of God to hold and lead,
His eye to watch, his might to stay,
His ear to hearken, to my need;
The wisdom of my God to teach,
His hand to guide, his shield to ward;
The word of God to give me speech,
His heavenly host to be my guard.

Christ be with me,
Christ within me,
Christ behind me,
Christ before me,
Christ beside me,
Christ to win me,
Christ to comfort
And restore me.
Christ beneath me,
Christ above me,
Christ in quiet,
Christ in danger,
Christ in hearts of
All that love me,
Christ in mouth of
Friend and stranger.

I bind unto myself today
The strong Name of the Trinity,
By invocation of the same,
The Three in One, and One in Three.
Of whom all nature hath creation,
Eternal Father, Spirit, Word:
Praise to the Lord of my salvation,
Salvation is of Christ the Lord.

Behind the lines

For more on Saint Patrick here’s a helpful article from Ligonier Ministries on Who Was Saint Patrick and Should Christians Celebrate St. Patrick’s Day? 

 

 

 

The God of Love My Shepherd Is

George Herbert (1593-1633) is well known for his collection of 167 poems published under the title of The Temple soon after his death in 1633. The popularity of his poem collection grew and by 1709 it surpassed 13 editions (Source: George Herbert).

J.R. Watson, the author of The English Hymn: A Critical and Historical Study, states:

Herbert’s influence upon later writers was pervasive, engaging the admiration of Puritans and High-Churchmen alike. Richard Baxter thought ‘He speaks to God like one that really believeth in God, and whose business in this world is the most with God.’  His poems were quarried again and again for material for hymns: in 1697 a volume appeared entitled Select Hymns Taken out of Mr. Herbert’s Temple & Turned into Common Metre, and in 1737 John Wesley re-versified some of his poems for his first hymn-book, A Collection of Psalms ad Hymns…”

Below is one of Herbert’s poems from Psalm 23:

The 23d Psalme

The God of love my shepherd is,
And he that doth me feed:
While he is mine, and I am his,
What can I want or need?

He leads me to the tender grasse,
Where I both feed and rest;
Then to the streams that gently passe:
In both I have the best.

Or if I stray, he doth convert
And bring my minde in frame:
And all this not for my desert,
But for his holy name.

Yea, in death’s shadie black abode
Well may I walk, not fear:
For thou art with me; and thy rod
To guide, thy staff to bear.

Nay, thou dost make me sit and dine,
Ev’n in my enemies sight:
My head with oyl, my cup with wine
Runnes over day and night.

Surely thy sweet and wondrous love
Shall measure all my dayes;
And as it never shall remove,
So neither shall my praise.

Philadelphia

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I walked the city,
With a history of making history,
Declaring the power of pen and parchment,
Where old bricks and mortar,
Meet glass and steel,
And rivers of concrete,
Lead to fountains of love.

I walked the city,
Under gray skies and tall shadows,
Where museums reveal treasures,
Churches chime old hymn tunes,
Bells ring for freedom,
And river bridges lead to,
The Avenue of the Arts.

I walked the city,
Each step an adventure of old and new,
With parallel parked cars,
Red lights, and walk signs,
Markets, and tour guides,
Street vents, and subway trains,
And people on the move, going somewhere – special.

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