The Throne Of Grace

This encouraging hymn by Samuel Medley (1738-1799) is based on Hebrews 4:16 and can be found in Gadsby’s Hymns (#382).

“Let us then with confidence draw near to the throne of grace, that we may receive mercy and find grace to help in time of need.”

Dear Lord! to us assembled here
Reveal thy smiling face,
While we, by faith, with love and fear,
Approach the throne of grace.

Thy house is called the house of prayer,
A solemn sacred place;
O let us now thy presence share,
While at the throne of grace.

With holy boldness may we come,
Though of a sinful race,
Thankful to find there yet is room
Before the throne of grace.

Our earnest, fervent cry attend,
And all our faith increase,
While we address our heavenly Friend
Upon the throne of grace.

His tender pity and his love
Our every fear will chase;
And all our help, we then shall prove,
Comes from the throne of grace.

Dear Lord, our many wants supply;
Attend to every case;
While humbled in the dust we lie,
Low at the throne of grace.

We bless thee for thy word and laws;
We bless thee for thy peace;
And we do bless thee, Lord, because
There is a throne of grace.

Anne Steele – A Hymn Story

This Anne Steele hymn story is one of the most searched and viewed posts on GraceSyallabes. I hope you enjoy the reblog about her life of hymn-writing.

GraceSyllables

This “Hymn Story” highlights the life and works of Anne Steele (1717-1778). Anne was one of the first significant female hymn writers and she wrote 144 of them. One my favorites is When I Survey Life’s Varied Scene and I’ve included it below.

Enduring much hardship in her life, Anne’s hymns are most known for laments that encourage us to trust God through difficulties. This particular hymn offers hope and brings powerful praise by focusing on His grace in the midst of struggle.

There is controversy surrounding her story, but shouldn’t every good story have a little controversy? Hymnary.org is one source that provides the following details of her life:

“Anne Steele was born at Broughton, Hampshire, in 1717. Her father was a timber merchant, and at the same time officiated as the lay pastor of the Baptist Society at Broughton (England). Her mother died when she was 3. At the age of 19 she became an…

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The God of Love My Shepherd Is

George Herbert (1593-1633) is well known for his collection of 167 poems published under the title of The Temple soon after his death in 1633. The popularity of his poem collection grew and by 1709 it surpassed 13 editions (Source: George Herbert).

J.R. Watson, the author of The English Hymn: A Critical and Historical Study, states:

Herbert’s influence upon later writers was pervasive, engaging the admiration of Puritans and High-Churchmen alike. Richard Baxter thought ‘He speaks to God like one that really believeth in God, and whose business in this world is the most with God.’  His poems were quarried again and again for material for hymns: in 1697 a volume appeared entitled Select Hymns Taken out of Mr. Herbert’s Temple & Turned into Common Metre, and in 1737 John Wesley re-versified some of his poems for his first hymn-book, A Collection of Psalms ad Hymns…”

Below is one of Herbert’s poems from Psalm 23:

The 23d Psalme

The God of love my shepherd is,
And he that doth me feed:
While he is mine, and I am his,
What can I want or need?

He leads me to the tender grasse,
Where I both feed and rest;
Then to the streams that gently passe:
In both I have the best.

Or if I stray, he doth convert
And bring my minde in frame:
And all this not for my desert,
But for his holy name.

Yea, in death’s shadie black abode
Well may I walk, not fear:
For thou art with me; and thy rod
To guide, thy staff to bear.

Nay, thou dost make me sit and dine,
Ev’n in my enemies sight:
My head with oyl, my cup with wine
Runnes over day and night.

Surely thy sweet and wondrous love
Shall measure all my dayes;
And as it never shall remove,
So neither shall my praise.

Together

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Together we come to worship,
With our hearts united in Christ,
Walking the path to forever,
Together we carry His light.

In love, we stir one another,
And work through our sin and our hurts,
Walking the path to forever,
The Groom leads the bride and His church.

Together we journey in grace,
Steps of faith through joy and sadness,
Walking the path to forever,
Narrow, but filled with His kindness.

Come let us serve Him together,
With talents and gifts that we bring,
Walking the path to forever,
As we praise our great God and King.

Together we come to worship,
With our hearts united in Christ,
Walking the path to forever,
Together we carry His light.

Behind the lines

Let us hold fast the confession of our hope without wavering, for he who promised is faithful. And let us consider how to stir up one another to love and good works, not neglecting to meet together, as is the habit of some, but encouraging one another, and all the more as you see the Day drawing near. (Hebrews 10:23-25 ESV)

So if there is any encouragement in Christ, any comfort from love, any participation in the Spirit, any affection and sympathy, complete my joy by being of the same mind, having the same love, being in full accord and of one mind. Do nothing from selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourselves. Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others. (Philippians 2:1-4 ESV)

Put on then, as God’s chosen ones, holy and beloved, compassionate hearts, kindness, humility, meekness, and patience, bearing with one another and, if one has a complaint against another, forgiving each other; as the Lord has forgiven you, so you also must forgive. And above all these put on love, which binds everything together in perfect harmony. And let the peace of Christ rule in your hearts, to which indeed you were called in one body. And be thankful. Let the word of Christ dwell in you richly, teaching and admonishing one another in all wisdom, singing psalms and hymns and spiritual songs, with thankfulness in your hearts to God. And whatever you do, in word or deed, do everything in the name of the Lord Jesus, giving thanks to God the Father through him. (Colossians 3:12-17 ESV)

The Excellency of the Holy Scriptures

Anne Steele (1717-1778) wrote this twelve verse hymn highlighting the infinite worth and beauty of Scripture. May the Divine Instructor teach us to love His Sacred Word. May God’s celestial lines cheer our fainting minds.

FATHER of mercies, in thy word
What endless glory shines!
For ever be thy name ador’d
For these celestial lines.

Here mines of heavenly wealth disclose
Their bright, unbounded store:
The glittering gem no longer glows,
And India boasts no more.

Here may the wretched sons of want
Exhaustless riches find:
Riches, above what earth can grant,
And lasting as the mind.

Here, the fair tree of knowledge grows,
And yields a free repast,
Sublimer sweets than nature knows,
Invite the longing taste.

Here may the blind and hungry come,
And light, and food receive;
Here beams the meanest guest have room,
And taste, and see, and live.

Amidst these gloomy wilds below,
When dark and sad we stray;
Here beams of heaven relieve our woe,
And guide to endless day.

Here springs of consolation rise,
To cheer the fainting mind;
And thirsty souls receive supplies,
And sweet refreshment find.

When guilt and terror, pain and grief,
United rend the heart,
Here sinners meet divine relief,
And cool the raging smart.

Here the Redeemer’s welcome voice,
Spreads heavenly peace around;
And life, and everlasting joys
Attend the blissful sound.

But when his painful sufferings rise,
(Delightful, dreadful scene!)
Angels may read with wondering eyes
That Jesus died for men.

O may these heavenly pages be
My ever dear delight,
And still new beauties may I see,
And still increasing light.

Divine instructor, gracious Lord,
Be thou for ever near,
Teach me to love thy sacred word,
And view my Saviour there.

Morning Hymns

One of my favorite times to write is early in the morning.

One of my favorite devotionals is Morning and Evening: A New Edition of the Classic Devotional Based on The Holy Bible, English Standard Version by C.H. Spurgeon.

One of my favorite Bible passages is Lamentations 3:21-26.

And some of my favorite morning hymns to read (yes, I like to read old hymns) were written or translated by John Brownlie (1857-1925).

While Brownlie is not well-known, he devoted much of his life to writing and translating hymns. You can read a short biography here. Toward the bottom of the page you will see several of his works available to download for free in PDF format. For instance, the Hymns of the Apostolic Church.

What I enjoy most about Brownlie’s hymn collection is the way he categorizes them into topics. He often has a Morning category, plus an Index of First Lines.

Below is a morning hymn from the Hymns of the Apostolic Church.

I
The morn awakes; from eastern hills
The golden light creation fills;
And arrows chase the night that flies
Before the ever-brightening skies.
II
The morn awakes; up, soul of mine,
And, like the morn, in beauty shine;
Strong, as the high-ascending sun,
Thy race of duty boldly run.
III
Night for the weary comes at length;
Morn gives the soul the needed strength;
Light shall thy path encircling, cheer,
And melt each lingering cloud of fear.
IV
O Light of lights, when night descends,
And brooding fear my life attends,
Shew to my soul, that night departs
When morning trims her glowing darts.
V
O Christ, Who art my Better Sun,
Bright shines the day with Thee begun;
No terror can the mind oppress,
Nor cloud th’ aspiring soul distress.
VI
To Thee, O glorious Light of light,
Be honour paid when morn is bright;
To Father, and to Spirit blest,
Be glory every day exprest.

Here’s a link to one of my own Morning Songs.

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